Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

A Five Star Pick

MusicophiliaAs you may know (if you read my About page) I am a music freak and I am fascinated with how beats and tones come together to make the wonderful thing we call music or songs.  If you are just like me, you will love this book.  Not only does Sacks’ work show how music can be medicinal for your body and soul, but it also reveals startling studies about memory—of how even when that part of your brain may not remember people anymore, but it will certainly remember a tune.  It is amazing to read about the special case studies of patients that Sacks had observed during a trip to an Alzheimer’s care facility.  The facts and stories that he so easily transcribes to paper is a treat to take in.  I always wanted to know how music affects the body/brain, so all is explained in simple terms, while also maintaining your interest on the topic.  His writing flows as if it were fiction.  In fact, his style of recounting information is so pleasant that I would read anything else he might try his hand at—even if it were about the most boring topic in the world!  There is an unspoken love story between the human mind and how songs can affect people’s emotions.  Those who miss out on the healing properties of music are really at a disadvantage.  It is during those times when I drive in my car with my radio blasting that I feel so sorry for those who are hearing impaired.  Music is a gift to be grateful for 🙂

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2 Responses to Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

  1. Jenn says:

    “Your Brain on Music” might interest you. The author is a prof at McGill. His newest book “The World in Six Songs” is also interesting.
    http://daniellevitin.com/publicpage/books/this-is-your-brain-on-music/

    • Melissa says:

      I have read both those books already and I did enjoy them too. I liked Levitin’s first book a little better than the second, but they were still good. The difference between the authors is the storytelling. Oliver Sacks makes you feel like you are reading a story because of his case studies.

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