Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Book vs. Movie

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (book)    Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (movie)

Often when writing these segments of the blog I either say that I loved both versions of the title or preferred the novel more than the movie.  It is rare that I choose the film over the book but in this case, I have to admit that I enjoyed the onscreen rendition more.  It isn’t because I saw it first that I liked it better.  There are differences in the novel that I preferred not to read about, such as the fact that Oskar’s mother has a “friend” whom she spends time with (named Ron), after Oskar’s father dies.  In the book, the old man who accompanies Oskar on his search for the lock is Mr. Black, instead of his grandfather.  There are, of course, scenes that are not added to the film but I find it didn’t harm the plot to leave them out.  What we do discover in the novel is the full background story of Oskar’s grandparents.  It is interesting to see why his grandfather leaves his own wife and son but again, for the film’s purpose, it could be left out.  I think what I liked most about the movie was how it portrayed Oskar’s relationship with everyone.  A strong bond is really seen between father and son in the screen version, but we don’t grasp the closeness of this relationship in the novel.  Also, there were times that I was confused when reading the book because there were a few points of view that jumped back and forth between different characters—some using personal letters of correspondence.  Overall, I was more emotional after seeing the film than reading the novel and I liked how the movie ties everything up with a positive outlook.  One thing I was curious about was the scene where Oskar finds out what his key opens.  It is the same outcome in both versions, but I was hoping for more answers in the book, if not from the film.  The novel was good, but the movie was beautiful.  Any thoughts about this?

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